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How Do You Say Alcohol in Spanish?

Mark Halsey
Chief Editor of - Cleanbreak Recovery

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands...Read more

¡Salud! Are you wondering how to say “alcohol” in Spanish? Learning the Spanish word for alcohol is essential for those who travel to Spanish-speaking countries or want to learn the language. In this article, we’ll explore the different ways to say alcohol in Spanish and how to use them in conversation. So, if you’re ready to start your Spanish alcohol vocabulary, let’s get started!

How Do You Say Alcohol in Spanish?

The Word for “Alcohol” in Spanish Is “Alcohol”

The Spanish word for “alcohol” is “alcohol.” The same word is used for both the chemical substance and for alcoholic beverages. The Spanish language does not distinguish between the two, so the same word is used for both. In Spanish, the word “alcohol” is pronounced ah-koh-ohl.

The word “alcohol” comes from the Arabic word “al-kuhl,” which means “fine powder.” The term was first used in the 16th century to refer to the powder that was left behind when wine was distilled. Over time, the word came to refer to any distilled beverage, and eventually to the chemical substance itself.

In Spanish, alcohol is used as both a noun and a verb. For example, you can say “Tomo alcohol” (I drink alcohol) or “El alcohol es peligroso” (Alcohol is dangerous).

Types of Alcohol in Spanish

In Spanish, there are many different words for different types of alcoholic beverages. Beer is known as “cerveza” (say-vay-sah), wine is “vino” (vee-no), and liquor is “licor” (lee-kor). Hard cider is “sidra” (see-drah), and hard seltzer is “refresco espumoso” (ray-fray-skoh ehs-poo-moh-soh).

Different types of spirits also have their own names in Spanish. Tequila is “tequila” (tay-kee-lah), vodka is “vodka” (voh-kah), and whiskey is “whisky” (wee-skee). Gin is “ginebra” (heen-eh-brah), rum is “ron” (rone), and brandy is “brandy” (brahn-dee).

Alcohol in Popular Spanish Phrases

In Spanish, the word “alcohol” is often used in popular phrases and expressions. For example, “estar achispado” (ay-star ah-chee-spah-doh) is a phrase that is used to describe someone who is tipsy or drunk. It literally translates to “to be spiked with alcohol.”

Another popular phrase is “en los brazos del alcohol” (en lohs brah-sohs del ah-koh-ohl). This phrase is used to describe someone who is addicted to alcohol. It literally translates to “in the arms of alcohol.”

Alcohol in Spanish Culture

In Spanish culture, alcohol is an important part of many social occasions. It is often served at meals and gatherings, and is used to mark special occasions. In some parts of Spain, it is traditional to offer a toast with a glass of wine or beer at the beginning of a meal.

Alcohol is also a major part of Spanish festivals and celebrations. Wine is often served at religious festivals, and beer is a popular choice for music festivals and sports events.

Alcohol in Spanish Cuisine

Alcohol is also an important part of Spanish cuisine. It is used in a variety of dishes, from desserts to sauces. In some parts of Spain, it is traditional to serve a “tinto de verano” (teen-toh day vay-rah-no), which is a mixture of red wine and soda.

In Spain, it is also traditional to serve a “sangria” (sahn-gree-ah). This is a mixture of red wine, orange juice, and sometimes brandy. It is often served with fruit, such as oranges or apples.

Alcohol in Spanish Music

Alcohol is also an important part of Spanish music. There are many traditional songs that mention alcohol, such as “La Cucaracha” (lah koo-kah-rah-chah), which is about a cockroach that is looking for a bottle of tequila.

There are also many popular Spanish songs about drinking, such as “El Borracho” (el bor-rah-choh), which is about a man who is too drunk to make it home.

The Spanish Word for “Drunk” Is “Borracho”

The Spanish word for “drunk” is “borracho” (bor-rah-choh). This word is used to describe someone who is intoxicated or has had too much to drink. It can also be used as a verb, as in “estoy borracho” (es-toy bor-rah-choh), which means “I am drunk.”

The word “borracho” is often used in a humorous way to describe someone who has had too much to drink. It can also be used to describe someone who is acting foolishly or out of character.

The Word for “Drunkard” in Spanish Is “Borrachuzo”

The Spanish word for “drunkard” is “borrachuzo” (bor-rah-choo-zoh). This word is used to describe someone who drinks excessively and often. It is usually used in a derogatory way, and is often used to describe someone who is an alcoholic.

The Word for “Hangover” in Spanish Is “Resaca”

The Spanish word for “hangover” is “resaca” (ray-sah-kah). This word is used to describe the feeling of discomfort that often follows a night of drinking. It is usually used in a humorous way, and can also be used to describe a situation or event that has unpleasant consequences.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q1. How Do You Say Alcohol in Spanish?

A1. The Spanish word for alcohol is “alcohol”. The word is derived from the Arabic term “al-kuhl,” which literally means “BODY-EATING SPIRIT.” This phrase was originally used to describe a type of distilled spirit, which has since become known as alcohol. Although the word is derived from Arabic, the Spanish translation of “alcohol” is the same as it is in English.

Alcohol & Drinking vocabulary in Spanish!

In short, the answer to “how do you say alcohol in Spanish?” is alcohol. Whether you are looking to order a drink at a bar or purchase a bottle of wine, alcohol is the word you need to know in Spanish. With just a few key words and phrases, you can easily navigate the alcoholic beverage options in Spanish-speaking countries.

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands the complex needs of those struggling with addiction and utilizes a comprehensive and holistic approach to address them. He is well-versed in traditional and innovative therapies, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness-based interventions.

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