Call Recovery Ranger for help today. +1-866-256-2052 Helpline Information

What Medicine Helps With Opiate Withdrawal?

Mark Halsey
Chief Editor of - Cleanbreak Recovery

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands...Read more

Opiate addiction and withdrawal can be incredibly difficult to overcome. The physical and psychological symptoms of opiate withdrawal can be intense and can last for weeks. Fortunately, there are medications available to help relieve the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and make the recovery process more manageable. In this article, we’ll explore what medications are available to assist in opiate withdrawal and how they can help.

What Medicine Helps With Opiate Withdrawal?

What Medications Are Used to Ease Opiate Withdrawal?

Opiate withdrawal can be incredibly uncomfortable and difficult for those who are trying to get off of opioids. Fortunately, there are medications that can be used to help manage the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and make the process much easier. Common medications used to ease opiate withdrawal include buprenorphine, clonidine, naltrexone, and methadone.

Buprenorphine is an opioid medication that works to reduce the intensity of withdrawal symptoms by binding to opioid receptors in the brain. It is commonly used to treat moderate to severe opioid addiction and can be taken in oral or injectable form. It is important to note that while buprenorphine can help with withdrawal symptoms, it is still considered an opioid and can be abused.

Clonidine is a non-opioid medication that helps to reduce the severity of opiate withdrawal symptoms by managing the body’s reaction to stress. It is typically prescribed in pill form and can be taken up to three times per day. Clonidine works to reduce anxiety, muscle aches, sweating, and other common symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

What is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that helps to reduce cravings and prevent relapse in those who are trying to stop using opioids. It is usually prescribed in a pill form and works by blocking the effects of opioids in the brain. Naltrexone can be used in conjunction with other medications to help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse.

What is Methadone?

Methadone is an opioid medication that is used to help those who are addicted to opioids manage their withdrawal symptoms. It works by mimicking the effects of opioids and reducing cravings. Methadone is typically prescribed in a liquid form and must be taken daily to be effective. It is important to note that while methadone can be helpful in treating opioid addiction, it can be habit-forming and should only be taken under the guidance of a doctor.

What Other Treatments Can Help With Opiate Withdrawal?

In addition to medications, there are other treatments that can be used to help manage the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a type of talk therapy that can help those struggling with addiction to identify and address the underlying factors that led to the development of their addiction. It can also help to reduce cravings and improve coping skills.

Exercise can also play an important role in managing the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Exercise can help to reduce stress and anxiety and can also help to reduce cravings. It is important to find an activity that you enjoy and to make it a regular part of your routine.

Finally, support groups can be an invaluable resource for those who are trying to overcome opioid addiction. Support groups can provide a safe space for individuals to talk about their experiences and can also provide helpful resources and advice.

How to Choose the Right Medication for Opiate Withdrawal?

When choosing the right medication for opiate withdrawal, it is important to speak to a doctor or healthcare professional. They can help to assess your individual needs and provide guidance on which medications may be best for you. It is also important to remember that while medications can help to manage the symptoms of opiate withdrawal, they should not be used as a sole treatment. A comprehensive treatment plan should include a combination of medications, psychotherapy, and support groups.

The Pros and Cons of Using Medications to Treat Opiate Withdrawal

Medications can be an effective way to manage the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and reduce the risk of relapse. They can also help to reduce cravings and improve the chances of a successful recovery. However, it is important to remember that medications can have side effects and should only be taken as directed by a healthcare professional.

The Benefits of Non-Medication Treatments for Opiate Withdrawal

Non-medication treatments such as CBT and exercise can be beneficial for those who are trying to overcome opioid addiction. They can help to reduce stress and anxiety, improve coping skills, and provide a sense of community and support. Additionally, non-medication treatments can help to reduce the risk of relapse and can provide individuals with the tools they need to maintain long-term sobriety.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Opiate Withdrawal?

Opiate withdrawal is a set of symptoms that occur when someone who has been taking opiates such as heroin, oxycodone, morphine, or other prescription painkillers suddenly stops taking the drug. The symptoms can range from mild to severe and usually start within a few hours to a few days after the last dose. Common symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches, sweating, insomnia, anxiety, and cravings.

What Medicine Helps With Opiate Withdrawal?

There are several medications that can help reduce the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Commonly prescribed medications include buprenorphine and methadone, which are both opioid medications designed to reduce cravings and reduce withdrawal symptoms. Clonidine is also often prescribed to reduce anxiety, insomnia, and muscle aches. Additionally, medications like naltrexone or vivitrol can be used to block the effects of opiates and help prevent relapse.

How Long Does Opiate Withdrawal Last?

The length of opiate withdrawal varies from person to person, but typically lasts between one week and one month. The most intense symptoms usually occur within the first week and begin to decline after that. However, cravings and psychological symptoms such as anxiety and depression can last for several months.

Are There Home Remedies for Opiate Withdrawal?

Yes, there are some home remedies that can help reduce the symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Some of these remedies include drinking plenty of fluids, eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and avoiding triggers that may cause a relapse. Additionally, taking hot baths, using relaxation techniques, and getting plenty of rest can help reduce stress and make it easier to cope with withdrawal.

What Are the Side Effects of Opiate Withdrawal Medications?

The side effects of opiate withdrawal medications vary depending on the type of medication. Common side effects of buprenorphine and methadone include nausea, drowsiness, headache, constipation, and dizziness. Clonidine may cause drowsiness, dry mouth, and constipation. Naltrexone and vivitrol can cause headaches, dizziness, and nausea.

Can Opiate Withdrawal Be Dangerous?

Opiate withdrawal can be dangerous if not managed properly. Severe symptoms can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalances that can be fatal. Additionally, psychological symptoms such as depression and anxiety can lead to suicidal thoughts. It is important for anyone going through opiate withdrawal to seek medical attention as soon as possible.

In conclusion, opiate withdrawal is a difficult and uncomfortable experience that can be managed with the right medicine. A combination of medications such as buprenorphine, methadone, clonidine, and naltrexone can help reduce the intensity of the symptoms and make it easier to make a successful recovery. Additionally, seeking professional help from mental health professionals and addiction specialists can provide invaluable guidance and support throughout the process.

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands the complex needs of those struggling with addiction and utilizes a comprehensive and holistic approach to address them. He is well-versed in traditional and innovative therapies, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness-based interventions.

More Posts

Leave a Comment