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Will Benzodiazepines Show on a Drug Test?

Mark Halsey
Chief Editor of - Cleanbreak Recovery

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands...Read more

Drug testing is an important tool used by employers and law enforcement to detect illicit drug use in individuals. But what about prescription medications that are legally prescribed by a doctor? One such medication is benzodiazepines, a type of tranquilizer commonly prescribed to treat anxiety, insomnia, and seizures. But will benzodiazepines show up on a drug test? In this article, we will explore the answer to that question and discuss the implications of benzodiazepine use on drug testing.

Will Benzodiazepines Show on a Drug Test?

Will Benzodiazepines Show on a Drug Test?

What are Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines, also known as benzos, are a type of medication used to treat a variety of medical conditions, such as anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, and seizures. They are generally prescribed by a doctor to help a patient manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life. Benzos are quite common and are used by millions of people around the world.

Benzodiazepines work by affecting the brain’s chemical balance and calming the nervous system. They are typically taken orally or intravenously by a patient, and can be found in both short-acting and long-acting forms.

How Do Benzodiazepines Affect Drug Tests?

Benzodiazepines are usually detected by drug tests and will show up on a urine or blood test. However, the amount of the drug that is detected can vary depending on the type of test that is used. Urine tests are more likely to detect benzodiazepines because they detect smaller amounts of the drug than blood tests.

The detection time, or the amount of time that it takes for the drug to be detected, also varies depending on the type of drug test that is used. Urine tests can detect benzodiazepines for up to a week after the drug has been taken, while blood tests can only detect the drug for a few days.

Are There Any False Positives?

False positives, or when a test incorrectly shows the presence of benzodiazepines when they are actually not present, do occur. This can happen if a person has been exposed to other medications or substances that contain benzodiazepines.

It is also possible for a person to test positive for benzodiazepines even if they have not taken them, as the drug can be found in trace amounts in some foods and beverages. For example, some beers and wines contain trace amounts of benzodiazepines.

What is the Best Way to Avoid a False Positive?

The best way to avoid a false positive is to make sure that you are not taking any medications or substances that contain benzodiazepines. It is also important to disclose any medications that you are taking to the person who is administering the drug test.

Conclusion

Benzodiazepines can be detected on a drug test, and the amount that is detected can vary depending on the type of test that is used. False positives can occur, so it is important to make sure that you are not taking any medications or substances that contain benzodiazepines.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines are a class of medications that are commonly prescribed to treat anxiety and insomnia. They produce a calming effect and work by increasing the activity of a neurotransmitter called GABA. Commonly prescribed benzodiazepines include alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan).

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

The amount of time that benzodiazepines stay in your system varies based on the type of benzodiazepine, as well as the person’s age, body weight, and frequency of use. Generally, most benzodiazepines have a half-life of between 1 to 4 days and can be detected in the body for up to 6 weeks.

Will Benzodiazepines Show on a Drug Test?

Yes, benzodiazepines can be detected on drug tests. Depending on the type of test, benzodiazepines may show up in urine, blood, saliva, or hair samples. Generally, a urine test is the most common type of drug test and can detect benzodiazepines for up to 14 days after the last dose.

What Type of Drug Tests Can Detect Benzodiazepines?

Urine tests are the most common type of drug test used to detect benzodiazepines. Blood tests, saliva tests, and hair follicle tests can also detect benzodiazepines. Hair follicle tests can detect benzodiazepines for up to 90 days after the last dose.

Are There Any False Positives for Benzodiazepines on Drug Tests?

Yes, there is the potential for false positives on drug tests for benzodiazepines. Certain medications, such as the antibiotic Cipro, have been known to cause false positives for benzodiazepines on drug tests.

What Can You Do if You Test Positive for Benzodiazepines on a Drug Test?

If you test positive for benzodiazepines on a drug test, it is important to speak with your healthcare provider to confirm the results. If the results are accurate, your provider can work with you to determine the best course of action. Depending on the situation, your provider may recommend changing or discontinuing your medication, or offering an alternative treatment option.

In conclusion, benzodiazepines will show on a drug test. While it is possible to mask the presence of benzodiazepines in a drug test, it is not recommended, as it is illegal and can lead to serious legal consequences. If you are taking benzodiazepines, it is important to be honest with your doctor and speak with them about your options.

Mark Halsey is a licensed therapist, founder, and chief editor of Clean Break Recovery. With over a decade of addiction treatment experience, Mark deeply understands the complex needs of those struggling with addiction and utilizes a comprehensive and holistic approach to address them. He is well-versed in traditional and innovative therapies, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and mindfulness-based interventions.

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